Marillion

Marillion are seamlessly morphing into the godfathers of progressive rock but that’s not to say they’ve lost the ability to shock as a compelling creative force. The release of 2016’s F.E.A.R. proved to be a treasure trove of ambitious songwriting and politically charged lyricism that represented a new career high. This is what HRH Mag’s Simon Rushworth had to say about a landmark album:

 

Is there a more affecting vocalist in rock that Marillion’s mesmerising Steve Hogarth? Authentic, convincing, melodic and more, the band’s brilliant singer takes on the politically-charged FEAR with genuine relish and there’s a sense that this typically cerebral release could represent a post-Fish career high for a band that continues to push progressive rock’s boundaries.

Divided into five new tunes – spread across 17 chapters – Marillion’s latest masterwork reveals layer upon layer of jaw-dropping musicianship.

The very antithesis of the download age, FEAR is an album that demands commitment and a record that must be experienced in one sitting. Its momentum builds and the dazzling denouement nears – thought-provoking set closer Tomorrow’s New Country (part six of The Leavers) hinting at a better future following the band’s take on a disturbing present-day scenario.

Hogarth might grab the headlines but this is the sound of band stronger together: Living In FEAR proves rumours of Marillion’s demise were wildly premature. One of only two standalone tracks it’s a stirring example of perfectly conceived progressive rock.

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